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EXCHANGE 2016 – WHAT’S NEW?

EXCHANGE 2016 – WHAT’S NEW?

Now that Microsoft has Exchange Server 2016 it’s time to have a closer look at what’s new in the product. It might not be a surprise that it looks a lot like Exchange Online. Not surprisingly since Microsoft is developing Exchange for the cloud, and Exchange on-premises is just a spin-off of Exchange Online, released on a quarterly basis.

It might be blunt to say, but Exchange 2016 is nothing more than Exchange 2013 Service Pack 2, if you look at the version numbering with PowerShell (Get-ExchangeServer | Select Name,AdminDisplayVersion) you’ll see that it’s actually a minor upgrade from 15.0 (Exchange 2013) to 15.1 (Exchange 2016).

The question can be raised why a new version? It’s all about the support lifecycle, and get rid of support for Exchange Server 2007. Customers need a new version, from a support point of view or from a license point of view (software assurance).

But, back to Exchange 2016… it is a new version, and with a new version also new features are introduced and other features are deprecated or removed.

New in Exchange 2016

There are a number of new features introduced in Exchange 2016 which can all be found on the Microsoft web site, and I’ll discuss a few of them here.

Outlook on the Web

Outlook on the Web is the rebranded new version of OWA. It has an improved look-and-feel and works smoother than before. This sounds like a lot of marketing blah blah but it is actually true. Outlook on the Web is also the primary email client for Exchange Online. This is the client that is controlled by the Exchange development team, and a lot of effort is put into Outlook on the Web. New features are introduced in Outlook on the Web first, sometimes way before these features are included in Outlook itself. Look at Office 365 Groups, these have been available in OWA for almost a year now, and they are now introduced in Outlook 2016! The same is true for something called Modern Attachments, but I’ll get back on these later on…

 

 

1

Figure 1. The new User Interface for Outlook on the Web.

Strongly related to Outlook on the Web is another server role (not an Exchange server role though!) called Office Online Server 2016, the successor of Office Web Apps server 2013. This server is used by Exchange to render Office attachments for use in Outlook on the Web. As such it is a mandatory role, but a lot of people don’t realize this.

 

 

2

 

Figure 2. Office attachment, rendered in Office Online Server and shown in Outlook on the Web

From an end-user perspective new in Exchange 2016 is a feature called Modern Attachments (it might get boring, but this was also already available in Exchange Online). With modern attachments you can send out email messages with (very) large attachments, but the attachments are not actually attached to the email message, they are stored on OneDrive for Business, and only the link to the attachment in OneDrive for Business is attached to the email message. This is working in Outlook on the Web and in Outlook 2016. Very nice improvement!

Simplified Architecture

Microsoft has released a whitepaper with the Preferred Architecture. This is a whitepaper about deploying Exchange 2013, and the thought behind this whitepaper is like “we know how to deploy Exchange”. The simplified architecture is Microsoft’s way to enforcing the Preferred Architecture to this new version. You can check Ross Smith’s presenation at Ignite about the Preferred Architecture on Channel 9: http://aka.ms/ExchangePAIgnite

It means that by default the old Client Access server role and Mailbox server role are now combined into only one server role, the Exchange 2016 Mailbox server role. Under the hood it’s nothing more than the old multi-server role, but it is now enforced. This means you can no longer install dedicated Client Access server roles anymore. The Client Access components are still available however, you can see this when installing Exchange 2016 unattended:

 

 

3

Figure 3. The Client Access components are clearly visible during Unattended Setup

At the same time it means you cannot use Windows NLB anymore if your servers are configured in a Database Availability Group, which is most likely the case. For load balancing purposes you have to use ahardware load balancer with Exchange 2016, and it is now recommended to use a Layer-7 solution.

MapiHttp as the default protocol

MapiHttp is now the default protocol for Outlook clients to connect with Exchange 2016, and Outlook Anywhere (which has been around since Exchange 2003!) is now deprecated. For MapiHttp you need Outlook 2013 SP1 or higher, for Outlook 2010 (SP2 or higher is needed for Exchange 2016) Outlook Anywhere is still used.

MapiHttp is much more efficient than Outlook Anywhere, it is more stable when working with flaky Wifi networks and starting up the Outlook client is much faster compared to Outlook Anywhere. After the release of Exchange 2013 SP1 I wrote an interesting article about Mapihttp which you can find here: http://bit.ly/MapiHttp

Auto Expanding Archives

Maybe you have heard about Auto Expanding Archives recently,Expanding Archives has blogged something about this cool feature. You start with a 100GB Archive Mailbox, and at one point when this Archive Mailbox reaches its limit, it is automatically increased with 50GB increments (it actually adds another 50GB Archive Mailbox, but this is fully transparent). This feature is already available in Exchange Online, but unfortunately this feature did not make it to Exchange 2016 at this point. Maybe it will in a future CU, but that’s unknown at this moment.

Storage Improvements

Just like previous version, Microsoft has made some improvements to the way ESE (Extensible Storage Engine, i.e. the database engine in Exchange) is working. But it is not only the ESE improvements, Microsoft now also recommends using the ReFS (Resilient File System) instead of NTFS. ReFS was already supported in Exchange 2013, but it is now a recommended solution. Fellow MPV Michel de Rooij blogged about using ReFS in Exchange 2013 and found some interesting facts. You can find his blogpost here:http://bit.ly/ExReFS.

Deprecated in Exchange 2016

New versions come with new features, and at the same time a new version is used to cut old features, or deprecate them. It can also happen that features are on the feature list, but simply don’t make it. This is a small list of features that are not available or deprecated in Exchange 2016:

  • Support for Outlook 2007
  • Support for Exchange 2007
  • Outlook Anywhere
  • Client Access server role
  • MAPI/CDO

Integration with Office 365

Exchange 2016 is even further integrated into Office 365. When you have a hybrid environment more options are available then when you have a pure on-premises environment. Look at features like Exchange Online Protection (ok, this is available in a stand-alone environment with Exchange on-premises as well), the new Compliance Center or Modern Attachments.

To facilitate these hybrid improvements Microsoft also released a new Hybrid Configuration Wizard, which is available as a separate download:

Coexistence scenarios

Since Exchange 2013 and Exchange 2016 are so close together, coexistence between the two is very, very easy. Unlike previous versions, Exchange 2013 Client Access can proxy requests to Exchange 2016 Mailbox, and of course Exchange 2016 can proxy requests directly to Exchange 2013. This up-version proxy makes integration between the two very easy. Just add Exchange 2016 servers to an existing, load balanced array of Exchange 2013 Client Access server and continue working. It doesn’t matter where the user’s Mailbox is located, it is fully transparent. The client experience matches the version of the Mailbox server where the Mailbox is located.

 

4

 

 

Figure 4. Up-version proxy with Exchange 2013. Just add Exchange 2016 servers to a load balanced array of Exchange 2013 Client Access servers.

It is not possible to add Exchange 2016 Mailbox servers to an Exchange 2013 Database Availability Group, so you have to create a new DAG with new Mailbox databases. Once created you can gradually move Mailboxes from Exchange 2013 to Exchange 2016 and when needed, gradually add Exchange 2016 servers and gradually phase out Exchange 2013 servers.

Coexistence with Exchange 2010 is ‘old skool’, this is not different then the Exchange 2010/2013 coexistence we’ve seen in the past. Create a new load balanced array of Exchange 2016 servers, configure the Exchange 2016 virtual directories, configure Outlook Anywhere and MapiHttp and import existing SSL certificates (no need for a legacy namespace). At this point you can swing your existing namespace to the Exchange 2016 servers and start moving Mailboxes.

 

5

Figure 5. The Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2016 coexistence is not different compared to the Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013 coexistence.

In my humble opinion, the coexistence scenarios, especially the Exchange 2013/Exchange 2016 version is a very neat solution and makes life much easier than in the past. This is one of the great improvements that comes out of Office 365.

Note. Coexistence with Exchange 2007 is not supported, and it is blocked hard-coded in the setup application.

Summary

Version 2016 is the latest version of Exchange server. Since all development is done in Office 365 (i.e. Exchange Online) it might not be a surprise that Exchange 2016 is very similar to Exchange Online. The look and feel and functionality are clearly derived from Exchange Online. Unfortunately not all nice features are available on-premises. Delve, Clutter and Office 365 Groups (now called Outlook Groups) are features that are only available online, the hardware resources needed to implement this are huge, and not feasible for on-premises customers.

The development in Exchange Online also bring a lot of improvements. Take a look at the Exchange 2013/2016 coexistence, this is a great solution coming straight out of Exchange Online.

Exchange 2016 at the same time is moving more and more to Office 365 and a great features are available when creating a hybrid configuration, where Exchange 2016 is integrated with Exchange Online. This is something that takes place today, but will be even more improved the upcoming years.

Which brings us to the last question that is bothering quite a number of customers: will this be the last version of Exchange on-premises? It all depends on customer demand of course, as long as there are major customers that implement Exchange on-premises, Microsoft will continue delivering software. Will there be a new major version in a couple of years? I personally doubt it since Microsoft will continue to deliver new features and functionality through Cumulative Updates on a regular basis, so maybe we end up with Exchange 2016 CU20 in the Calender Year 2020,

 

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Deploying an Exchange 2013 Hybrid Lab Environment in Windows Azure

Deploying an Exchange 2013 Hybrid Lab Environment in Windows Azure

In this articles series, steps necessary to deploy an Exchange 2013 hybrid lab based on Windows Azure virtual machines.
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part1.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part2.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part3.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part4.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part5.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part6.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part7.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part8.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part9.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part10.html
http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/office-365/exchange-online/deploying-exchange-2013-hybrid-lab-environment-windows-azure-part11.html


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Standard Operating Procedure for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

Standard Operating Procedure for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013

How many IT professionals do I need to manage my Microsoft Exchange Server environment?” Unfortunately, there is no simple answer to this question. But to help you in your planning, this topic describes several major factors you must consider to calculate your optimal workforce level. This topic will help you assess the many facets of your organization so that you can make an informed decision about workforce levels.

Organizational Maturity

Essentially, organizational maturity is determined by the level to which an organization has developed its internal policies and procedures. For example, an organization with very few defined procedures for managing the messaging environment and that has no standard operating procedures for server configuration may experience more incidents and outages than another organization that has carefully documented policies about driver updates, patch installation, and server configuration.

However, organizational maturity is not restricted to the use of policies. It also includes the means by which administrators manage an environment. For example, an administrator can apply hotfixes to 10 servers by logging into each server, and then downloading and installing the hotfixes on each one in turn. This process is extremely inefficient. By contrast, one administrator using an automated patch deployment system could easily deploy hotfixes to 100 servers in a few minutes, exponentially increasing efficiency. However, that patch management solution would, itself, have to be actively managed. This requirement would demand more resources, and would have to follow specific policies and procedures to ensure a healthy, accurate solution.

Organizational maturity is built on the following principles:

  • Operational process maturity:  Typically, if you have created well-documented and repeatable operational practices, the need for constant or reactive maintenance is reduced because most tasks will be automated.
  • Experience:   The level of knowledge and relevant work experience possessed by the operations team members has a positive impact on the team’s ability to manage an enterprise messaging solution.
  • Hardware:   Efficient systems and good storage practices help maintain a high degree of user satisfaction and can greatly reduce the number of support calls or outages.
  • Reliability:   Related to hardware, reliability is a function of the combination of hardware, software, features that are in use, and the demands on the system. Often, a reliable solution is one that is chosen specifically to meet the full demands of a given workload.
  • Design:   An appropriate design of the Exchange environment increases the effectiveness of all the aforementioned principles. Conversely, a poor design can cause the hardware or staff experience to be less effective.

Infrastructure Optimization model

Level

Characterization

Basic

Systems are complex and incompatible. Most IT personnel spend their time reacting to problems and are just trying to keep things running. If there are few standards and automated tools in use, IT support is labor-intensive and expensive.

Standardized

IT departments are more centralized and effective. But systems remain complex, incompatible, and expensive to maintain. Pockets of standalone systems reside in business groups.

Rationalized

IT and business groups develop strategies and define IT policies, which are enforced through technology. Through standards and careful engineering, applications work together with improved compatibility.

Dynamic

Business agility takes priority over cost savings. IT systems are highly automated, flexible, and respond quickly to changing business conditions.

For more information about Infrastructure Optimization, see Microsoft Infrastructure Optimization.

The key differentiator among the levels of the Infrastructure Optimization model is how technology is used and the standardization of systems across many levels and groups. Generally, the higher the organizational maturity level, the lower the required staffing level for managing the environment. However, technology by itself doesn’t increase an organization’s maturity level. All solutions must be managed to successfully support accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and stability. An organization’s policies should be driven by business need, and the technology should support or facilitate those policies.

Defining Roles and Assigning Tasks

Staffing levels are also heavily dependent upon the demands placed on the enterprise messaging team. These demands can vary greatly from organization to organization. An organization that asks its messaging administrators to deploy, configure, manage, and maintain only the Exchange Server 2010 systems will require fewer staff than one which asks administrators to manage Exchange, backups, messaging hygiene, mobile devices, network, storage, and virtualization technologies.

The following list includes some of the critical questions to consider when you evaluate the role of the messaging administrator in your organization:

  • Does your Exchange team have primary responsibility for the underlying Windows operating system on the servers that are running Exchange?
  • Is your Exchange team responsible for other technologies, such as Active Directory Domain Services, Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010, or Microsoft SQL Server?
  • Does your Exchange team manage the physical hardware of the Exchange environment, such as servers, network, and storage? Or, if your Exchange servers are virtualized, do the Exchange administrators manage the virtualization solution?
  • Does your Exchange team manage backups (tape-based or disk-based) for the Exchange servers?
  • Does your Exchange team manage the messaging hygiene infrastructure? Does your Exchange team manage non-Exchange software or hardware?
  • Does your organization separate the roles of operations and design/architecture for messaging?
  • Does your Exchange team manage network or perimeter security for messaging?
  • Does your Exchange team perform direct end-user support? If so, does the team receive all messaging-related tickets or only those that have been escalated from tier 1 and tier 2?
  • Do Exchange team members perform standard daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, or yearly tasks? If so, what are those tasks? What additional tasks should be added to the list?
  • Are Exchange team members responsible for responding to security issues involving messaging resources?
  • Are Exchange team members asked to perform discovery searches and handle other compliance-related matters?
  • Do Exchange team members perform capacity management?

This list isn’t exhaustive. There may be critical tasks for messaging administrators in your organization that are not listed above. Additionally, there are other positions, such as operations manager, whose job description and required tasks are markedly different from those of messaging administrator. It’s important to consider all positions in the context of the entire team rather than focus on individual positions.

The following list describes the potential responsibilities assigned to roles and functions that are common to many large and medium enterprise messaging deployments. In many cases, the listed role is a subset of an existing role (for example, Director) instead of a specific position. For example, this is the case of Operations Engineers.

  • Director 
    • Provides messaging technology vision based technology capabilities and business need.
    • Coordinates activities of messaging operations and messaging system engineering.
    • Represents all aspects of the enterprise’s messaging system to internal and external sources.
  • Manager, Messaging Operations 
    • Makes sure that the messaging system is functioning at peak performance.
    • Makes sure that the messaging operations team is aware of system slowdowns and performance degradation before these problems affect users.
    • Makes sure that all messaging operations technicians and all operations analysts have the tools they need to do their jobs.
    • Represents messaging operations to users.
  • Manager, Messaging System Engineering 
    • Drives the messaging team towards constant analysis and design review with the goal of improving the messaging system’s performance.
    • Makes sure that the messaging team has the necessary tools and training to do their jobs.
    • Responds to appropriate escalations from the operations team and allocates resources to those escalations.
  • Associate Operations Analyst 
    • Installs, configures, and documents new production servers in the messaging environment.
    • Performs rudimentary troubleshooting of messaging system problems.
  • Operations Analyst 
    • Installs, configures, and documents new production servers in the messaging environment.
    • Performs all troubleshooting of messaging system problems.
    • Ensures that problems are correctly documented in the daily log.
  • Senior Operations Analyst 
    • Assists with mentoring new Operations Analysts; performs duties of the Operations Analyst when required.
    • Handles escalation issues not resolved by Operations Analyst and Technicians.
    • Makes sure that the daily log remains a useful repository of system troubleshooting information.
  • Associate Operations Engineer 
    • Works with Operations Analysts and Technicians to perform rudimentary analysis and design.
    • Brings ideas and recommendations to other members of the engineering team for further discussion.
  • Operations Engineer 
    • Works with Operations Analysts and Technicians to perform detailed analysis and design.
    • Handles initial escalations from the operations side
    • Troubleshoots and follows up on all escalations from operations team.
    • Evaluates features of released products for usability in the enterprise messaging system.
  • Senior Operations Engineer 
    • Evaluates released and unreleased messaging systems.
    • Provides detailed test plans for features to be implemented.
    • Attempts to minimize all impacts of next generation releases of message product.
    • Handles extreme escalations and interfaces with Microsoft Technical Support, if necessary.
  • Messaging Operations Technician 
    • Handles day-to-day monitoring and reporting on the messaging system.
    • Ensures that events are properly recorded in the daily log.
    • Ensures that all events that transpired during his or her shift have been recorded and reported to appropriate personnel.
    • Also handles escalation requests from standard “PC Helpdesk” department.

To increase the accuracy of any workforce staffing level calculations, it helps if you clearly define the roles of the various messaging team members and then objectively assess the demands of those roles.

Assessing Technology Impact

After your organization has defined the various roles and responsibilities, the next step is to assess the technology, and then map the desired tasks to the technical components of the solution. Often, improvements in the software may let administrators complete specific tasks much quicker than in previous versions, may enable administrators to automate common workflows, or may enable administrators to delegate specific tasks to other individuals or other teams.

Consider this example. Woodgrove Bank administrators often receive requests to restore mailboxes to retrieve mistakenly deleted items. These requests require the involvement of a messaging engineer (who has the necessary permissions to access the Exchange Server 2003 systems), as well as a backup engineer (who handles the actual restore operation). The requirement to restore deleted content will still be present after Woodgrove Bank deploys Exchange Server 2010, but if they choose to enable single item recovery for all users, the actual restoration work could be performed by a messaging administrator (who was granted the appropriate permissions via Role Based Access Control) or by a compliance administrator in the Human Resources department. Because the backup engineer is no longer involved in the restoration operation, the overall process is simpler and presumably can be completed in less time.

Exchange Server 2010 includes several features that could potentially let management reassign tasks at different levels, to different teams, or eliminate the need for the task completely. The following table describes several major features in Exchange Server 2010, together with the changes to tasks that these features may support. The features described in this table aren’t an exhaustive list. Of course, you may choose to employ these features at your discretion.

Feature

Possible changes to tasks

Database Availability Groups

By having three or more database copies, Exchange administrators can adopt a native data protection strategy, reducing the demands on the backup team.

Single Item Recovery

Eliminate the need for restoring backups simply to recover a single deleted item.

Role Based Access Control (RBAC)

Let’s administrators delegate tasks at a granular level without exposing the organization to major security risks.

PowerShell (expanded in Exchange Server 2010, also present in Exchange Server 2007)

Lets administrators automate common tasks, including many user, group, mailbox, and database maintenance tasks , via PowerShell scripts.

Multi-mailbox search

Combined with RBAC, lets administrators delegate discovery to other individuals, most likely in Human Resources.

Lets trusted individuals perform discovery against mailboxes in the environment without third-party tools.

Exchange Control Panel

Lets users manage certain aspects of their messaging experience, including distribution groups and message tracking, thus reducing the demands on the help desk.

Personal Archive

Lets administrators absorb functionality formerly provided by Personal Folders (.pst files), thus removing a common source of support calls.

Retention Policies

Lets administrators control the e-mail lifecycle (by setting a maximum e-mail message age), possibly reducing the number of compliance issues in the messaging environment.

While the above list is specific to Exchange Server 2010, the principle of matching task to technology holds true no matter which version is in use. Using the technology to its fullest lets administrators perform their duties in the most efficient manner possible, freeing their time for other tasks and reducing the demands on other teams as well.

Calculating Staffing Levels

As stated at the beginning of this topic, there is no simple formula to provide a specific recommended number of staff to manage a given Exchange organization. The range of factors is too complex and too varied. Two organizations of similar size and scope may require vastly different staffing levels based on the required duties of the administrators, the administrators’ experience managing Exchange, and the degree of automation in the environment.

The most important factor to consider when calculating staffing levels is the amount of time that is needed to perform all required tasks given the current infrastructure. It may also be appropriate to calculate the amount of time that is required to perform all desired tasks given an idealized infrastructure, if significant changes will be made to the environment which would increase the operational maturity level. The sum total of hours is then translated into a recommended staffing level, taking into account other factors including the length of the work day, the length of the work week, and the average number of vacation and sick days. The staffing level should always be rounded up to the next integer value to ensure that staffing levels exceed the required time rather than fall short.

The following sample Exchange Operations task checklist indicates the level to which tasks should be detailed before staffing levels are calculated.

Example:

 

In this example, the organization determined that the total number of tasks requires 9,792 hours. Given that a full-time employee works 1,635 hours, this analysis suggests that the organization requires 600 percent of a single individual—or, more appropriately, six FTEs—to manage their Exchange organization. Note that this sample task list is for the operations team only. The customer has to perform the same analysis for the engineering and help desk teams, as well.

SAMPLE – Exchange Operations Task Checklist (per location)

Activity

Est. Time (hrs)

Frequency

Annual Work Effort

Planning

     

     Participation in next-version assessment discussions

8

Annually

8

     Feedback from operations

2

Quarterly

8

     SLA definitions

4

Annually

4

     Operations documentation

1

Annually

1

Exchange Administration

     

     Backup and Restore

1

Daily

260

     Perform regular backup

1

Daily

260

     Backup Active Directory system state

1

Daily

260

     Verify back up media

1

Monthly

12

     Offsite back up media

1

Daily

260

     Change backup media regularly

1

Daily

260

     Set mailbox and message retention times on all client servers

1

Quarterly

4

     Defragment mailbox and public folder stores

1

Monthly

12

     Verify integrity of the mailbox and public folder stores

1

Weekly

52

Risk Management

     

     Identification

1

Annually

1

     Analysis and prioritization

0.5

Annually

0.5

     Mitigation and contingency planning

0.5

Annually

0.5

Additional Work as Assigned

     

     New projects

100

Annually

100

     Help desk escalation support

1

Daily

260

     Review open service tickets

2

Daily

520

     On-site visit (travel time)

2

Monthly

24

Total

   

9791.5

     Available Hours per Man Year

   

1635

     Percentage of work consumed by Exchange tasks

   

599%

The number of positions also depends on the complexity and size of the organization. Small organizations may combine roles or omit them entirely, while large organizations may have multiple individuals in certain roles. For example, one large financial services corporation has a messaging team which manages resources for 45,000 users on a 24 hours a day, seven days a week basis. Their messaging services staff typically includes 30-32 individuals in the positions shown in the following table (whose roles and responsibilities are defined in “Defining Roles and Assigning Tasks” earlier in this topic).

Position title

Number of staff

Director

1

     Manager, Messaging Operations

1

          Sr. Operations Analyst

2

          Operations Analyst

3

          Assoc. Operations Analyst

0-1

          Technicians

17

     Manager, Messaging System Engineering

1

          Sr. Operations Engineer

2

          Operations Engineer

2

          Assoc. Operations Engineer

1

Conclusion

To determine the number of engineers, administrators, and other support personnel that are required to manage a specific Exchange environment, you must carefully gather business requirements, consider a variety of factors, and, above all, plan. You can determine your required staffing level only after you determine the needs of the user community, define the roles to fulfill those needs, assess the technology, match the technology to the roles, and then, finally, calculate the time required to perform the desired tasks. It’s an involved process, but the ultimate results should closely align the capabilities of the messaging team to the needs of the business (and users) without unnecessarily encumbering either organization or team with superfluous head count.


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Comparing Exchange Online and Exchange Server 2013

Exchange Online for Office 365 for enterprises Exchange Server 2013
Cost You won’t need to worry about purchasing, upgrading and managing hardware with Exchange Online to help reduce the total cost of ownership of your email system. Updates, upgrades and 24×7 IT phone support is included.

It’s also important to note that onboarding to Office 365 doesn’t mean that you will no longer need to manage hardware altogether. Many organizations will maintain an on-premises Active Directory for example, and will want to maintain AD synchronization with Office 365 and optionally, ADFS.

We’ve continued to evolve the architecture and manageability of Exchange so that it helps reduce your TCO including supporting multiple databases per volume, layer 4 load balancing, a single web-based administrative interface, reduced overhead for high availability and more.

You still will need to deploy and manage Exchange software and hardware on-premises and will need to plan future hardware and software upgrades.

High availability High availability and redundancy is built in and there is a financially-backed 99.9% SLA for Exchange Online. We’ve enhanced managing high availability. Managing DAGs is simplified with automatic DAG network configuration, enhancements to lagged copies and management cmdlets.

Based on our experiences with managing Exchange Online, we’ve added Managed Availability to help maintain a good end user experience – not just worry about server uptime.

Management & control Manage Exchange from a single, web-based administrative experience with theExchange Administration Center which gives you rich capabilities and a streamlined experience.

Remain in control by testing out upcoming service enhancements via previews.

You get the greatest degree of control and customization on your configuration when you manage your on-premises servers including complete visibility into the deployment down to the level of server logs.

In addition, you can use Address Book Policies to provide different views of the Global Address List (GAL) to subsets of users within the same Exchange Organization.

Storage 25 GB by default. Configurable to meet your organization’s needs and policies.
Compliance Exchange Online includes the same rich feature set as Exchange Server 2013, including eDiscovery and DLP, so you can help enforce your organization’s compliance policies.

You can use transport rules and apply IRM protection with Azure Active Directory Rights Management.

You can help keep your organization safe from users accidentally sharing sensitive data with Data Loss Prevention (DLP) capabilities and allow compliance officers to run In-Place eDiscovery queries across Exchange, SharePoint and Lync from a single interface with the eDiscovery Center.

You can also use transport rules and apply IRM protection with your on-premises Windows Rights Management Services implementation.

Anti-spam/
anti-malware
The next release of FOPE will be called Exchange Online Protection (EOP) and as with FOPE is included as part of Exchange Online. EOP provides inbound and outbound spam filtering, reporting, message trace, multi-engine anti-malware and mail-flow configuration features. Many new enhancements have been introduced to EOP, including management which is fully integrated into the Exchange Administration Center. Basic anti-spam and anti-malware capabilities will be provided out-of-the-box. You can also add EOP to your deployment in order to get inbound and outbound spam filtering, reporting, message trace, multi-engine anti-malware and mail-flow configuration features. EOP management is done on a separate interface, but the user-interface will be identical to that of the new Exchange Administration Center.
Public Folders Public Folders are now supported in Exchange Online with new, modern public folders. We’ll supply a method to help you get your legacy public folders to modern public folders in the cloud. Modern public folders are now based on mailbox architecture so you’ll get the same storage and HA capabilities as normal mailboxes.
Security, privacy and regulatory compliance Security and privacy are important to you, and we place great emphasis on helping protect the privacy and security of your data. Office 365 is compliant with many world-class industry standards including ISO-27001 and FISMA. Check out the Office 365 Trust Center for more information. Exchange Server 2013 can be configured to meet virtually any compliance need and you have full control and responsibility over enforcing compliance policies and meeting your security requirements.
Migration We’ve unified the mailbox migration toolset and management interface to help simplify the migration process to Office 365 no matter which migration method meets your needs. The hybrid configuration wizard is included right within the Exchange Administration Center. We’ve enhanced the migration toolset which also means it’s a simpler process for moving mailboxes across databases or transitioning to the new Exchange.
Applications Some legacy applications, protocols, third party mail-enabled programs and API’s are not supported by Exchange Online. Your organizations may need to update or retire these when opting to move to the cloud. The good news is you can customize Outlook and OWA by utilizing the new cloud-based extensibility model with Apps for Outlook. The same apps work across the new Outlook and OWA. You can discover and install apps via the Office marketplace, control which apps end users are allowed to install, and use or develop your own. You get the highest degree of customization with managing Exchange on-premises, and you also get to leverage the new extensibility model with Apps for Outlook and the Office marketplace.

Exchange Server 2013 Gotchas

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Exchange Server 2013 reached RTM a couple of months ago and has since reached General Availability (GA).

OWA

  • Help -> About is gone
  • It’s very slow.
  • No S/MIME support
  • No Public Folder support, either for legacy public folders or modern public folders.
  • No distribution list moderation
  • No way to move the reading pane
  • Built-in spell-check is gone. IE 10 provides spell-check natively, but earlier versions of IE do not. A third-party add-in or an alternate browser is required.
  • Other things are gone; don’t waste too much time looking for them.

Client Connectivity

  • No BES support
  • …on a related note (and likely the primary reason BES is not yet available), the CDO/MAPI download is not yet available for Exchange 2013.
  • Outlook 2003 is no longer supported.
  • Direct MAPI access to the Exchange server is no longer supported.  RPC/HTTP (Outlook Anywhere) is required.
  • Outlook now reports that the server is it connected to is <<guid>>@<<active-directory-domain>>. This is intentional, if misguided.

Installation and Architecture

  • Cannot uninstall individual roles from a server, must uninstall all of Exchange
  • Install is painfully slow
  • The Hub Transport role is gone. There is now a Front End Transport service on CAS servers and Mailbox Transport services on Mailbox servers.
  • The Unified Messaging role is gone. There is a now a Unified Messaging Call Router service on CAS servers and a Unified Messaging service on Mailbox servers.
  • The CAS consists of three pieces: CAFE’ (Client Access Front End), which proxies all end-user protocols to the appropriate mailbox server (completing the decoupling of the MAPI endpoint started in Exchange 2010) and handles Outlook Web App; FET (Front End Transport) which proxies SMTP protocols to the mailbox server and is responsible for TLS setup; and Unified Messaging Call Router.
  • After an installation or an upgrade, services not starting is an endemic problem. You will likely need to increase ServicesPipeTimeout on your Exchange servers.
  • Documentation is minimal at best
  • Deployment and sizing guidance is non-existent.
  • Cannot be installed along with Exchange 2007 or Exchange 2010
  • Exchange 2013 Edge server is not available
  • Forefront Protection for Exchange is gone
  • For both Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013, applying updates can often screw up the winrm configuration. If you get errors in EMS or EAC regarding “The WS-Management service cannot process the request”, try this first:  winrm quickconfig
    iisreset
  • Since you cannot interop with legacy public folders in RTM, if you need an Organizational Forms Library, you must create it yourself. To create an Organizational Forms Library:  1. Create “Organizational Forms Library” folder under the Eforms Registry:

    New-publicfolder “Organizational Forms Library” -path “\non_ipm_subtree\Eforms Registry”

    2. Set the locale ID for the Org Forms Library:

    Set-PublicFolder “\non_ipm_subtree\Eforms Registry\Organizational Forms Library” -EformsLocaleID EN-US

    It is no longer necessary to set the PR_URL_NAME property.

Exchange Management

  • The Exchange Management Console is gone as is the Exchange Control Panel. They are mainly replaced by the Exchange Administration Center (EAC); which is completely web based.
  • If you are attempting to use EAC with IE 10, you need KB2761465 (released on December 11, 2012).
  • The Exchange Best Practices analyzer is no more.
  • The Exchange Mail Flow Troubleshooter is no more.
  • The Exchange Performance Troubleshooter is no more.
  • The Exchange Routing Log Viewer is no more.
  • The EAC does not provide a preview (or an after-view for that matter) of the PowerShell it executed.
  • Antispam and antimalware is crippled compared to earlier releases  The E15 AV does not offer a quarantine
    The E15 AS does offer a quarantine (for the administrator, not per-user)
  • Antispam cannot be managed from the Exchange Administration Center; it must be managed using PowerShell in the Exchange Management Shell
  • Kerberos Constrained Delegation (KCD) is not supported for OWA
  • This isn’t new, but should be reinforced: DO NOT TURN OFF IPV6. Microsoft does not perform any testing to determine the effects of disabling IPv6. Therefore, Microsoft recommends that you leave IPv6 enabled, even if you do not have an IPv6-enabled network, either native or tunneled. See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/network/cc987595.aspx.
  • System Center Data Protection Manager (DPM) version required for backups of Exchange 2013 is SC DPM 2012 SP1

Mailboxes and Databases

  • Mailbox sizes MAY appear to increase substantially when moving a mailbox to an Exchange 2013 mailbox server. In Exchange 2010 and before, only select properties of a particular mailbox item were assigned as part of the mailboxes diskspace allocation, causing under-reporting. Now, all item properties for a particular mailbox item are assigned to the mailboxes disk space allocation. However, some items in Exchange 2013 are now compressed which were not before. This can lead to a reduction in reported and allocated diskspace. So, prediction is basically impossible. Just be aware that it may happen.
  • Corrupt PropertyTags during a mailbox move are common. Using (Get-MoveRequestStatistics -IncludeReport <<alias-name>>).Report.Failures you can find the rule or message that is causing the problem and remove it.
  • Changes made to improve Office 365 and hybrid deployments had an unintended consequence (this is my conclusion). When you are performing impersonation (e.g., to open a different user’s mailbox via EWS), you should always impersonate using the email address.
  • As a corollary, it is recommended that the account UPN match the primary email address.
  • In a change that you won’t know about until you need to know it – MRS Proxy is not enabled by default in Exchange 2013. Use Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory to enable it.
  • Clean-MailboxDatabase is gone  Update-StoreMailboxState is designed to replace it
    Requires that you know the guid of the deleted mailbox
    No on-premises cmdlets allow you to find those out!
  • Get-LogonStatistics is non-operational. The cmdlet is still present, but it doesn’t work.
  • Exchange 2013 Enterprise Edition supports only 50 mailbox databases instead of the 100 supported in Exchange 2010
  • MRM 1.0 (Messaging Record Management – Managed Folders) is non-operational on Exchange 2013 mailbox servers. The cmdlets are still present, and will affect down-level servers (which you can’t use right now), but they don’t work with Exchange 2013 servers.
  • Moving mailboxes using the migration wizard in EAC can generate large amounts of log files for the database which hosts the arbitration mailbox. Use New-MoveRequest instead.
  • In a positive change, Office Filter Packs are no longer required. There is a new search technology used in all Wave 15 (Office 2013) products and it knows how to search all the Office file formats. This also includes the PDF format, so a separate iFilter installation for PDF is no longer required.
  • When using Database Availability Groups (DAGs) on Windows Server 2012, you must manually create the Cluster Network Object (CNO) and provision the CNO by assigning permissions to it.
  • While Windows Server 2012 provides support for large sectors (4 KB), Exchange 2013 does not support large sectors. Emulation of large sectors (512 E) is supported provided that all database copies are on 512 E.
  • The above statement is, in general, true. Additional capabilities of Windows Server 2012 are not supported by Exchange Server 2013. This specifically includes but is not limited to Hyper-V Replica.

Good luck!

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Exporing Users Mailbox to a PST file.

Following commands are used for import & export mailbox in pst file.

 

By default, the Mailbox Import Export management role isn’t included in any of the built-in role groups, such as the Organization Management role group. To import or export mailbox data, you need to add the Mailbox Import Export management role to a role group.

 

 

 

Following command is for adding assigns the Mailbox Import Export management role to the security group.

 

New-ManagementRoleAssignment -Name “Import Export_group name” -SecurityGroup “Group name” -Role “Mailbox Import Export”

 

 

Following command is for exporting user primary mailbox to a .pst file

 

New-MailboxExportRequest -Mailbox User -FilePath “c:\\User_Recovered.pst”

 

 

Following links are usefull for the same.

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee633452.aspx

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff607299.aspx 


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Moving Exchange Server 2003 cluster Node to another server

Shut down the Exchange Cluster node 2

CREATED new exchange server
New Exchange server name: node3

IP address: 172.30.33.73

Installed IIS

Installed Dot Net frame work 2.0

Installed exchange server 2003 with SP2

After that login to Exchange Server 2003 Cluster node 1

Replicate all public folders to another server

All public folders and system folders that are housed on the first Exchange 2003 computer must be replicated to another Exchange 2003 computer that is in the site. The remainder of this article refers to this other computer as the destination server. The server that is being removed is referred to as the source server.

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.
  2. If the Display administrative group’s option is turned on, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First Administrative Group.
    Note To display administrative groups, right-click Your_Organization, click Properties, click to select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK two times, and then restart Exchange System Manager.
  3. Expand Folders, expand Public Folders, right-click a top-level public folder, and then click Properties.
  4. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.
  5. In the Select a Public Store box, select the name of the server where you want a replica of this public folder (the destination server), and then click OK.
  6. Click Apply, and then click OK. If this public folder has any subfolders and if you want these subfolders to have a replica on the destination server, right-click the top-level public folder, click All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    Note When you are running Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Service Pack 2 (SP2), the Manage Public Folders Settings Wizard page may appear. You can use this wizard to modify client permissions, to modify lists of replica servers, and to overwrite public folder settings.

  7. In the Propagate Folder Settings box, click to select the Replicas check box, and then click OK. When you complete this step, all subfolders of that top-level folder have a replica on the destination server.

    Note For performance reasons, you may not always want to have replicas of all subfolders of a top-level folder on another server. You may want to consider this before you complete this procedure.

    For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

273479  Description of the public folder referral functionality in Exchange 2000 Server and in Exchange Server 2003

  1. Repeat steps 1 through 7 for all top-level folders and all subfolders that you want to replicate.
  2. After replicas have been made on the destination server, wait for replication to complete, and then make sure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. To do so, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the public folder that you want to verify, and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Replication tab, and then click Details.
  3. When replication has completed, the Replication Status column indicates In Sync.

                        After you have confirmed that replication is complete for each folder, you must turn off replication for each public folder. To do this, follow these steps:

 .        Expand Public Folders, right-click a top-level public folder, and then click Properties.

  1. Click the Replication tab.
  2. In the Replicate content to these public stores section, click the name of the public folder store that is on the source server, click Remove, click Apply, and then click OK.

After that we have moved all mailboxes to another server

Move mailboxes to another server

If this Exchange Server 2003 computer hosts any mailboxes, these mailboxes must be moved to another server before you remove this Exchange 2003 computer. To do this, follow these steps:

1. Start Exchange System Manager on the Exchange 2003 source computer.

2. Double-click Servers, and then locate the server container where the mailboxes of the users are located.

For example, if you want to move mailboxes from the default storage group and from the mailbox store, double-click First Storage Group, double-click Mailbox Store, and then click Mailboxes.

3. In the right pane, click the mailboxes that you want to move.

4. Right-click the selected users, and then click Exchange Tasks.

5. In the Exchange Task Wizard, click Next.

6. On the Available Tasks page, under Select a task to perform, click Move Mailbox, and then click Next.

7. On the Move Mailbox page, click Cross Administrative Group Move under Select the Type of Move, and then click Next.

8. On the Move Mailbox page, click the destination server that is in the Server list, click a mailbox store in the Mailbox Store list, and then click Next.

9. Configure how you want any corrupted messages that are found during the move to be handled, and then click Next two times.

Rehome the Offline Address Book folder

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.
  2. If the Display administrative groups option is turned on, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First Administrative Group (where First Administrative Group is the name of your administrative group).
    Note To display administrative groups, right-click Your_Organization, click Properties, click to select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK two times, and then restart Exchange System Manager.
  3. Expand Folders, right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    Note If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are already viewing the system folders.

  4. Expand Public Folders, and then expand Offline Address Book.
  5. Right-click /o=Organization Name/cn=addrlists/cn=oabs/cn=Default Offline Address List, and then click Properties.

    Note If you receive a message that the mail proxy for this folder was not found, click OK.

  6. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.
  7. In the Select a Public Store box, select the name of the server where you want a replica of this public folder (the destination server), and then click OK.
  8. Click Apply, and then click OK. If this public folder has any subfolders and if you want these subfolders to have a replica on the destination server, right-click the top-level public folder, click All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    Note When you are running Exchange Server 2003 SP2, the Manage Public Folders Settings Wizard page may appear. You can use this wizard to modify client permissions, to modify lists of replica servers, and to overwrite public folder settings.

  9. In the Propagate Folder Settings box, click to select the Replicas check box, and then click OK. When you complete this step, all subfolders of that top-level folder have a replica on the destination server.
  10. After replicas have been made on the destination server, wait for replication to complete, and then make sure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. To do so, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the public folder that you want to verify, and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Replication tab, and then click Details.
  3. When replication has completed, the Replication Status column indicates In Sync.

                        After you have confirmed that replication is complete for each folder, you must remove the replica from the source server. To do this, follow these steps:

 .        Right-click /o=Organization Name/cn=addrlists/cn=oabs/cn=Default Offline Address List, and then click Properties.

  1. Click the Replication tab.
  2. In the Replicate content to these public stores section, click the name of the public folder store on the source server, click Remove, click Apply, and then click OK.

                        Repeat step 11 for each subfolder of the offline Address Book and for each additional offline address list.

Change the server that is responsible for generating the Offline Address List

  1. Start Exchange System Manager, expand Recipients, and then click the Offline Address Lists container.
  2. In the right pane, right-click Default Offline Address List, and then click Properties.

    In the Default Offline Address List Properties dialog box, the server that is going to be removed from the administrative group will be in the Offline address list server list.

  3. Click Browse, and then type the name of the server that the replica of the Offline Address Book was added to in the “Rehome the Offline Address Book folder” section.
  4. Click OK.

    The new server is now listed as the Offline address list server.

  5. In the Default Offline Address List Properties dialog box, click OK. You may have to quit and restart the Exchange System Manager before the change is displayed.

Rehome the Schedule+ Free Busy folder

  1. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Exchange, and then click System Manager.
  2. If the Display administrative groups option is turned on, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand First Administrative Group (where First Administrative Group is the name of your administrative group).

    Note To display administrative groups, right-click Your_Organization, click Properties, click to select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK two times, and then restart Exchange System Manager.

  3. Expand Folders, and then click Public Folders.
  4. Right-click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    Note If you do not see a View System Folders option, you are already viewing system folders.

  5. Expand Schedule+ Free Busy, right-click EX:/o=Organization_Name/ou=Administrative_Group_Name folder, and then click Properties.

    Note If you receive a message that the mail proxy for this folder was not found, click OK.

  6. Click the Replication tab, and then click Add.
  7. In the Select a Public Store box, select the name of the server where you want a replica of this public folder (the destination server), and then click OK.
  8. Click Apply, and then click OK. If this public folder has any subfolders and if you want these subfolders to have a replica on the destination server, right-click the top-level public folder, click All Tasks, and then click Manage Settings.

    Note When you are running Exchange Server 2003 SP2, the Manage Public Folders Settings Wizard page may appear. You can use this wizard to modify client permissions, to modify lists of replica servers, and to overwrite public folder settings.

  9. In the Propagate Folder Settings box, click to select the Replicas check box, and then click OK. When you complete this step, all subfolders of that top-level folder have a replica on the destination server.
  10. After replicas have been made on the destination server, wait for replication to complete, and then make sure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. To do this, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the public folder that you want to check, and then click Properties.
  2. Click the Replication tab, and then click Details.
  3. When replication has completed, the Replication Status column indicates In Sync.

                        After you have confirmed that replication is complete, you must turn off replication for this folder. To do this, follow these steps:

 .        Expand Public Folders, right-click EX:/o=Organization_Name/ou=Administrative_Group_Name, and then click Properties.

  1. Click the Replication tab.
  2. In the Replicate content to these public stores section, click the name of the public folder store on the source server, click Remove, click Apply, and then click OK.
  3. Repeat step 11 for each subfolder of the Schedule+ Free Busy folder and for each additional folder that contains free and busy information that has been replicated to the destination server.

 

 

 

Rehome the Organization Forms folder

If the server that is being decommissioned has the Organization Forms folder homed and if this server has the only replica, replicate the Organization Forms folder to another server in the site. If you do not replicate this folder, clients may stop responding (hang) when non-delivery report (NDR) messages and read receipt messages are sent.

  1. Start Exchange System Manager, expand Administrative Groups, and then expand the name of your administrative group.
  2. Expand Folders, right- click Public Folders, and then click View System Folders.

    Note If you do not see the View System Folders option, you are already viewing system folders.

  3. Expand the EFORMS REGISTRY folder.

    If an Organization Forms library folder does not exist, ignore the rest of the steps in this section.

  4. Right-click the Organizational Forms folder, and then click Properties.

    Note If you receive a message that states that the mail proxy for this folder cannot be found, click OK.

  5. Add a replica of this folder to the destination server.

    For more information about how to add a replica of this folder to the destination server, see the “Replicate all public folders to another server” topic earlier in this article.

  6. After replicas have been made to the destination server, wait for replication to complete, and then make sure that the replica folders are synchronized with the source folders. To do this, view the properties of the specific public folder, click the Replication tab, and then click Details. If the Replication Status column indicates In Sync, the replica folders have been synchronized with the source folders.
  7. After you confirm that the replicas are synchronized, remove the replica of this folder from the source server.

    For more information about how to remove the replica folder from the source server, see the “Replicate all public folders to another server” topic earlier in this article.

Rehome the Recipient Update Service

  1. In Exchange System Manager, expand Recipients, and then click Recipient Update Services.
  2. In the column headings that are in the right pane, click Exchange Server to sort the available Recipient Update Services by the Exchange Server computer that hosts them.
  3. Right-click the Recipient Update Service that is hosted on the Exchange Server 2003 computer that you plan to remove, and then click Properties.
  4. On the General tab, next to the Exchange server box, click Browse.
  5. In the Select Exchange Server dialog box, click the name of another Exchange Server computer as the new server to host the Recipient Update Service, and then click OK two times.

Designate another server to be the routing group master

If this server is the routing group master, you must designate another server to be the routing group master. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. On the Exchange 2003 computer that you want to designate as the routing group master, start Exchange System Manager.
  2. If the Display administrative groups check box and the Display routing groups check box are selected, expand Administrative Groups, expand First Administrative Group, expand Routing Groups, and then expand First Routing Group. (First Routing Group is a placeholder for the name of the routing group where you want to change the routing group master.)

    Notes

    • To display administrative groups, right-click First Organization (First Organization is a placeholder for the name of your organization), click Properties, click to select the Display administrative groups check box, click OK two times, and then restart Exchange System Manager.
    • To display rooting groups, right-click First Organization, click Properties, click to select the Display rooting groups check box, and then click OK two times.
  3. Click Members, right-click the server in the right pane that you want to make the routing group master, and then click Set as Master

 

Create another Site Replication Service (SRS) instance

If this Exchange 2003 computer has the Site Replication Service (SRS) installed and running on it, you must create a new SRS in Exchange System Manager. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Start Exchange System Manager on the Exchange Server 2003 computer where you want to create the SRS, and then expand Tools.
  2. Right-click Site Replication Service, click New, and then click Site Replication Service.
  3. When you receive the Are you sure you want to install a new Site Replication Service on this server (ServerName) prompt, click Yes.
  4. When you receive the In order to create a Site Replication Service on the local machine, enter the password for the Exchange service account (Domain\service account) prompt, type the password for the Exchange service account.

This creates the SRS, and it also creates an associated configuration Connection Agreement.

For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

255285  How to create an additional Site Replication Service for a mixed site

 

Rehome connectors to another server

If this Exchange Server 2003 computer has any connectors that are hosted on it, these connectors must be rehomed to another server before you remove this Exchange 2003 computer from the routing group. For example, if the source server hosts an X.400 connector, you must set up this connector on the destination server.

 

Move mailboxes to another server

If this Exchange Server 2003 computer hosts any mailboxes, these mailboxes must be moved to another server before you remove this Exchange 2003 computer. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Start Exchange System Manager on the Exchange 2003 source computer.
  2. Double-click Servers, and then locate the server container where the mailboxes of the users are located.

    For example, if you want to move mailboxes from the default storage group and from the mailbox store, double-click First Storage Group, double-click Mailbox Store, and then click Mailboxes.

  3. In the right pane, click the mailboxes that you want to move.
  4. Right-click the selected users, and then click Exchange Tasks.
  5. In the Exchange Task Wizard, click Next.
  6. On the Available Tasks page, under Select a task to perform, click Move Mailbox, and then click Next.
  7. On the Move Mailbox page, click Cross Administrative Group Move under Select the Type of Move, and then click Next.
  8. On the Move Mailbox page, click the destination server that is in the Server list, click a mailbox store in the Mailbox Store list, and then click Next.
  9. Configure how you want any corrupted messages that are found during the move to be handled, and then click Next two times.

For more information about how to move mailboxes in Exchange Server 2003, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

821829  Moving mailboxes in Exchange Server 2003

 

 

Remove the first Exchange Server 2003 computer

Insert the Exchange Server 2003 CD in the CR-ROM drive in the Exchange 2003 computer, and then click Remove for each component that has been installed.

For more information, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

235396  How to determine the first Exchange Server computer in the site

152959  How to remove the first Exchange Server in a site

284148  How to remove the last Exchange Server 5.5 computer from an Exchange 2000 administrative group

282061  How to rebuild a Site Replication Service without a backup

For more information about how to rehome public folders in Exchange 2000, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

288150  How to rehome public folders in Exchange 2000

 

For more information about this topic for Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 and for Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

152959  How to remove the first Exchange server in a site

275171  How to reset system folders on an Exchange 2000 server